Top 10 Data Center Cooling Stories of 202018 min read

by | Jan 6, 2021 | Blog

With 2020 officially over, we wanted to take a look back at our top stories from the The Upsite Blog. It was a busy year with many things to talk about—everything from discussing how to re-use data center heat energy to exploring the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on our industry. We shared a lot of content that we hope you not only enjoyed reading, but also found useful. Here are the top 10 articles that data center professionals like you shared the most in 2020:

1. Top Data Center Trends and Predictions to Watch for in 2020

By Upsite Technologies

top-data-center-trends-and-predictions-to-watch-for-in-2020Opinions below have been contributed by Bill Kleyman (Switch), Bob Bolz (Aquila, Inc.), Ian Seaton (Independent Consultant, formerly CPI), Lars Strong (Upsite Technologies), and Mark Acton (Independent Consultant/EkkoSense).

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2. Data Centers Are More Than Blinking Lights and Big Buildings

By Bill Kleyman

data-centers-are-more-than-blinking-lights-and-big-buildingsI’ve been given a unique opportunity to work closely with the next generation of technologists, future thinkers, and builders of the digital age. In working with the iMasons organization I’ve had the chance to see just how important diversity and inclusion is in this world.

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3. Data Center Heat Energy Re-Use Part 1: Ship the Hot Air Next Door

By Ian Seaton

data-center-heat-energy-re-use-part-1-ship-the-hot-air-next-doorIs it possible to recycle some data center energy to achieve a PUE less than 1.00? Over the years I have heard such claims in various sales presentations, coffee corner casual asides and even unretractable press releases. Such claims are invariably followed by wise nods, knowing winks and, “Well, somebody doesn’t understand PUE basic math.” 

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4. Utilizing AI to Understand and Visualize Airflow Management and Optimize Data Center Cooling

By Lars Strong

ekkosoft-critical-v6By now, many of us have probably heard that the vast majority of data centers are over-cooled in one way or another. For the most part, this statement is true and isn’t just a sales tactic or marketing lingo meant to sell you on a certain product or service.

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5. How to Structure Your Data Center Risk Management Plan

By Devin Partida

how-to-structure-your-data-center-risk-management-planToday’s business representatives who rely on data centers know that outages or other difficulties could directly affect their clients and profits. Therefore, a risk management plan is crucial for these critical facilities to operate smoothly to not only satisfy existing customers, but to also gain new ones.

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6. Introduction to International Data Center Standards – Part 1

By Mark Acton

introduction-to-international-data-center-standards-part-1It is clear that even without the recent increased dependency on digital infrastructure brought about by COVID-19, that demand for services from data centers will continue to increase. It is also evident that increasing demand will result in a greater consumption of power unless improvements in energy efficiency are applied.

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7. 7 Airflow Management Considerations in Building a New Data Center

By Ian Seaton

7-airflow-management-considerations-in-building-a-new-data-centerIf you think a discussion about some number of airflow management considerations in building a new data center is going to ring up the normal litany of plugging holes with filler panels and floor grommets, separating hot aisles from cold aisles, minimizing or eliminating bypass and recirculation, deploying variable air volume fans, intelligently locating perforated floor tiles and measuring temperature at server inlets, then you would be sorely mistaken.

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8. What You Need to Know About Room Airflow Management

By Lars Strong

ekkosense-room-airflow-managementRoom level airflow management is fraught with misconceptions and half-truths, making it the least understood aspect of airflow management, although it is ironically the most important. While it’s fairly well understood that the first 3 levels, or R’s, of airflow management refer to implementing solutions such as brush grommets, blanking panels, and containment for the Raised Floor, Rack, and Row levels, respectively, the Room level isn’t quite as simple.

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9. Data Center 2020: Jobs, Connectivity, and Hyperscale – Key Updates from the Latest AFCOM Report

By Bill Kleyman

data-center-2020-jobs-connectivity-and-hyperscale-key-updates-from-the-latest-afcom-reportOn January 14th of this year, support for Windows 7 ended as the end of life came for this product. Now the important question is, how many of you can actually remember that far back? In a year that’s felt like an entire decade, quite a bit has happened.

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10. What You Need to Know About Row Airflow Management

By Lars Strong

data-center-row-airflow-management

To put it simply, managing airflow at the Row level refers to improving cold aisle and hot aisle separation, and is typically done once you’ve made improvements at the Rack level (e.g. blanking panels) and Raised Floor level (e.g. brush grommets).

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The industry's first and only tooless containment solution!

AisleLok® is the industry’s first modular containment solution,
proven to provide the core benefits of containment with greater flexibility and value.

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